Intermediate 5 Alix Biehler [3° 12' 43" S, 5° 12' 40" W Moon] Moonday: a 708 hours day. An extension of our meridian, Which re-launches our Everyday. We say no to routine, Invent a new type of architecture.

0° 00' 05.3101" 0° 00' 00"

Ryan Dillon, David Greene

In 1592, as the story goes, Galileo Galilei paced back and forth at the bottom of the Leaning Tower of Pisa, stewing in the shadows cast by its 5.5° angle and deciding once and for all that he was going to knock that ancient Greek farce Aristotle off his perch. Determined, he discarded his chopine footwear and ascended the 284 steps to the top, carrying two objects of different weight in his hands. Sweating through his linen shirt and pulling at his collar ruff he gazed down from the bell tower at the ground below, his beard dangling over the iron railing. Defiantly he dropped the two objects and watched how their trajectory - along a straight line - fell to the earth at exactly the same time. At last, Aristotle's long held theory of gravity (that the speed at which two identically shaped objects fall is proportional to their weight) was obsolete. And now an emboldened Galileo understood that the line was a means to not just challenge conventional thought but to free himself of it. With this in mind, the unit will act upon "lines of flight", those trajectories which leak from and escape the systems and machines that dictate our everyday life.

Intermediate 5 will walk the 1851 Prime Meridian (0°'00'05.3101"), drive along the 1767 Mason-Dixon Line (39°'43'0"N, 75° 47'0"W) and set sail down the 1884 International Date Line (0°'0'0"N, 180°'0'0"W). This continues the unit explorations along a colinear slice through London that unveils the diversity of the city's architectures, infrastructures, cultures and inhabitants at the local scale while expanding beyond the M25 towards the global scale. With time as our guide these examinations will offer a series of social, technological, time-based and sometimes playfully random constraints as catalysts for generating the central aim of each unit project - a material architectural intervention to question the mechanisms that govern our existence.

Synthesising urban exploration and design, students will translate ideas through two- and three-dimensional drawing, writing and physical models that measure time. Focusing on current social and physical contexts and technological advances, Intermediate 5's objective is to use the fourth dimension as a line of demarcation within the built environment, optimistically altering our perception of everyday life by splintering the status quo into oblivion.

Unit Staff

Ryan Dillon has been Unit Master of Intermediate 5 since 2013 and also teaches in both the History & Theory programme and the AA DRL. He has also taught at the University of Brighton and has previously worked at Moshe Safdie Architects on projects such as the Khalsa Heritage Complex and the Peabody Essex Museum. David Greene, born Nottingham, England, 1937, usual English provincial suburban upbringing, art school, and onto London to begin a nervous, nomadic and twitchy carreer, from big buildings for developers to T-shirts for Paul Smith, to conceptual speculation for Archigram, which he founded with Peter Cook. Currently, perhaps, the Provost of the Invisible University.

Contact

AA School of Architecture Admissions (Undergraduate)
36 Bedford Square
London WC1B 3ES

T: +44 (0)20 7887 4051
F: +44 (0)20 7414 0779
undergraduateadmissions @aaschool.ac.uk

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Foundation Course Booklet


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Undergraduate Course Booklet


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